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The Bronx’s Matt Caughthran: Hosting ‘The Sailor Jerry Podcast’ Has Been a ‘Rewarding Experience’

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In honor of the 1st anniversary of ‘The Sailor Jerry Podcast, host and The Bronx frontman Matt Caughthran shares how he ‘flipped the script’ to host the show, his most’ teachable moment,’ and more!

Anyone can make a podcast, but not everyone can make a good podcast. It takes confidence, charisma, and the experience that one might get from fronting one of America’s most beloved punk bands – and even then, it might be hard going at first. Yet, Matt Caughthran, who hosts The Sailor Jerry Podcast, has made it look easy. The podcast — inspired by Norman “Sailor Jerry” Collins’ KTRG radio show Old Ironsides — turns one-year-old today (Jan. 14), the same day marking Norman Collins’ 111th birthday (click here for a cocktail perfect for a toast to the legend on his day). The Bronx’s singer tells HollywoodLife that he’s always been “pretty comfortable talking with strangers. That explains how his conversations with musicians (Big Freedia, Amyl and the Sniffers, Jim Lindberg), tattoo artists (Rose Hardy, Michelle Myles, Marina Inoue), and other creatives (Danielle Colby, Alex Yanes) have been as charming and intoxicating as a bottle of Sailor Jerry spiced rum.

“Being in a band and performing in a different city every night will generate some pretty amazing conversations and unforgettable memories,” shares Matt. “I think the biggest personal change for me has been flipping the script and looking at an interview or podcast episode from a listener’s perspective. It was really strange and somewhat nerve-racking at first to be the one asking the questions, ya know? I really want every episode of the Sailor Jerry Podcast to be great––and being on the other side of the conversation has been a really rewarding experience.”

During this EXCLUSIVE interview, Matt reveals a few personal highlights over the past year of hosting The Sailor Jerry Podcast, what fans can expect in year two, and who precisely the Pod Gods are.

HollywoodLife: What would you say has been your most significant personal change since doing the Sailor Jerry’s Podcast? Do you find yourself more inquisitive about the world, or would you say you’re more confident speaking to strangers?

Matt:  Believe it or not, I’ve always been pretty comfortable talking with strangers! Being in a band and performing in a different city every night will generate some pretty amazing conversations and unforgettable memories. I think the biggest personal change for me has been flipping the script and looking at an interview or podcast episode from a listener’s perspective. It was really strange and somewhat nerve-racking at first to be the one asking the questions, ya know? I really want every episode of the Sailor Jerry Podcast to be great––and being on the other side of the conversation has been a really rewarding experience.

What is one of your personal highlights of doing the first year of the Sailor Jerry podcast? Like, a moment that made you think, ‘Man, I’m glad I got to be here for this.’  

There have been a lot! Some of the moments that are really special to me are the ones with musicians I grew up listening to and have become friends with over the years. Artists like Dennis Lyxzén from Refused or Jim Lindberg from Pennywise. Two friends that I have always wanted to grill about their creative process but never have! The Podcast is the perfect outlet for all the creative conversations stuck in my head.

Similarly, what would you say has been the most memorable “learning moment” of the first year of the Sailor Jerry’s Podcast? (We’re not going to say mistakes or regrets.)  

[laughs] There have been a lot of those too! I’ve been pretty lucky for the most part, but let’s just say even a veteran musician like myself forgets to hit the “record” button every now and then!

You’ve had a lot of great guests on the show. Were there any guests you tried to get but couldn’t? Or is that a secret for year two?  

Unfortunately, The Sailor Jerry Podcast guest list is confidential. However, I can definitely promise that we have big things in store for 2022!

If you were to start a band with four of your guests – one of which can’t be a musician – who would you pick, and what would you call the band?  

Good question! This could definitely go a couple of different ways, but for now, I’ll pick Howlin’ Pelle Almqvist from The Hives on vocals, tattoo artist Mary Joy Scott on bass, Jordan Buckley from Every Time I Die, and Wade MacNeil from Dooms Children on guitars, and maybe Danielle Colby on keyboards?. I’d play drums, [laughs] The band would be called Pod Gods.

Your podcast turns one year old on the day that Norman “Sailor Jerry” Collins celebrates his 111th birthday. If he were here with us today and still as sharp and fiery as the rum that bears his name, what would you like to say to him?  

Oh man, what an interview that would be! I would just love the opportunity to thank him for letting me continue his legacy of creative madness via the Sailor Jerry Podcast!


Finally, any plans to get a tattoo to commemorate this anniversary?  

Wasn’t really planning on it, but now that you mention it, I think I just might!

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Original Article: hollywoodlife.com

Arts

SpaceWalk: a Spectacular Rollercoaster-Esque Staircase Loops Through a South Korean Park

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Art
Design

#public art
#sculpture
#stairs
#steel

SpaceWalk: A Spectacular Rollercoaster-Esque Staircase Loops Through a South Korean Park

January 27, 2022

Grace Ebert

All images (C) Heike Mutter and Ulrich Genth

Towering 70-meters above ground at its highest point, “SpaceWalk” is the latest undulating sculpture by Hamburg-based artists Heike Mutter and Ulrich Genth. The monumental staircase winds in loops and elevations similar to that of a rollercoaster throughout Hwanho Park in Pohang, South Korea, and is almost entirely accessible for pedestrians except for the innermost circuit. It’s the largest contemporary public sculpture ever installed in the country.

A follow-up to the pair’s 2011 project “Tiger & Turtle – Magic Mountain” in Duisburg, Germany, “SpaceWalk” is built of galvanized and stainless steels atop a cement foundation and embedded rows of LED lights. “At night in particular, the brightly-illuminated walkway appears like a sigil drawn in the sky, appearing to represent different things depending on where one is standing,” Mutter and Genth say. “Thus, the sculpture also references local mythology and a tradition of sky-gazing and also makes playful use of relativity.”

Pedestrians enter the work at a central staircase, which breaks into two paths: one gently sloped walkway leads to a view of Yeongil Bay and the surrounding city, while the other is a steeper climb through a helix. Both are designed to mimic an otherworldly experience. “The title ‘SpaceWalk’ is taken from the terminology of outer space missions. It describes the act of exiting the space vehicle in the weightlessness of outer space. More literally, ‘SpaceWalk’ can be understood to mean ‘a walk through space,'” they say.

For more of the duo’s architectural projects, head to their site. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

#public art
#sculpture
#stairs
#steel

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Archeologists Unearth a Roman Glass Bowl Dating Back 2,000 Years in Pristine Condition

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Craft
History

#archaeology
#bowls
#glass

Archeologists Unearth a Roman Glass Bowl Dating Back 2,000 Years in Pristine Condition

January 27, 2022

Grace Ebert

All images courtesy Marieke Mom, shared with permission

Sitting a few miles from the German border, Nijmegen is the oldest city in The Netherlands, and after a recent archeological dig, it’s also the site that unearthed a stunningly preserved bowl made of blue glass. The pristine finding, which is estimated to be about 2,000 years old, is from the agricultural Bataven settlement that once populated the region. Featuring diagonal ridges, the translucent vessel was made by pouring molten glass into a mold, sculpting the stripes while the material was liquid, and using metal oxide to produce the vibrant blue. Archeologists uncovered it without a single chip or crack.

Around the time the bowl was procured, Nijmegen was an early Roman military camp and later, the first to be named a municipium, or Roman city. Archeologist Pepjin van de Geer, who led the excavation, told the De Stentor that while it’s possible the vessel was created in a German glass workshop in cities like Cologne or Xanten, it’s also likely that the Batavians traded cattle hides to procure it. In addition to the piece, van de Geer’s team has also uncovered human bones, pitchers, cups, and other precious goods like jewelry, which indicates the site was once a burial ground. (via Hyperallergic)

The excavation site

#archaeology
#bowls
#glass

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PlayStation Plus Offers Tiny Tina’s Assault on Dragon Keep, UFC 4 in February

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Image: Gearbox Software/2K

Planet Coaster for PS5 rounds out the list

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Original Post: polygon.com

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